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Author Topic: Is A+ a plus?  (Read 2663 times)
A5H
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« on: August 08, 2002, 05:30:18 AM »

I'm currently aiming for my MCSA (halfway there), but how well known, and how highly regarded is the MCSA? I realise its a cut-down MCSE, and therefore has less prestige. But does it count for that much. Would it be better to gain A+ and CNA and show a more varied skill base?

Any advice please. :confused:
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exar07
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2002, 12:32:15 PM »

The M$ certs are good.  All the certs are getting watered down but they are good to have on your resume.  The A+ is really recognized as a basic tech cert.  

I dont want to tell you that one is more
valuable than the other because I wouldnt want you discourage you.  But if you check the Market for jobs and certifications that
Companies want us to have, you will see that
certian certs are not as recognized.
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thecomeons
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2002, 08:36:02 AM »

when i was made redundant, i looked at as many vacancy adverts as possible in the computer/networking industry. most of the jobs required mcse and degree as well experience and sql.

i think the thing is to find out what qualifications seem to be required in your area.

i do not have a degree. my experience is in desktop printing. i am a+ qualified and hope to be network+ qualified by the end of the year. i will evaluate if i want mcsa/mcse around that time.

at the end of the day, it all depends on what kind of job you want. the closest i got to a dream i.t. job was when i applied for the post of the-guy-who-delivers-the-systems-from-your-local-pc-shop-and-assembles-them-in-your-home, but the shop claimed to have lost my application form (even though they had told me that they would hold my resume on record three months previous!).
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ITuk
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2002, 10:47:45 AM »

At the moment the job market is not good,with my mcse,mcp,cna,a+,i am still looking for IT job,but i will keep on adding to my certs for future gain when the economy picks up.
so i will say go for mcsa, then after that full mcse.
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CoffeeFreak
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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2002, 12:31:13 PM »

i totally agree,,,
number 1,, A+ is not as big as it used to be, BUT it's kinda like the must have for the intro level jobs, Helpdesk, level1 support, even some helpdesk position's want a freakin MCSE now...

MCSE is the most marketable cert right now,, do a search on monster.com for the whole USA, you will find like 20 pages of jobs asking for a MCSE, and only about 6 pages asking for a CCNA, most are wanting CCNP just for intro,,,  alot of A+ too but they want A+ people with experience and you are still not going to get jack for $$,,even if you get a job,,,
best thing to do now it seems with the economy is get a degree, and work up to the bigger certs,, MCSE, MCSA, CCNP,

it seems if they offered a job of running fiber through a ditch in 100 degree heat for 6 bucks an hour most people would take it these days,,,:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
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A5H
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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2002, 02:38:47 PM »

Thanx all

I'd been wondering if my certs (or lack of) had been stopping me from finding a better job, but I guess I should be happy I've got one at all. I know jobs are scarce, but didn't realise it was that bad.
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thecomeons
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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2002, 03:12:08 PM »

u might want to check out a+ and network+. they work together as an elective for mcsa. costly though compared to what m$ exams u have to do instead.

best of luck, a5h.
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xonkers
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« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2002, 04:37:01 PM »

Im going through the exact same dilemna right now,
The good news is that my A+ did get me an interview with a big tech company and the skills I learned through A+ did help me easily pass their exams.

(a good point here is that some companies, like that one are not interested in tech-wizards who know all the latest outrageous sound cards or Linux buzzwords)

In fact - this companies exam was basically an A+ exam!

It didnt pay much but combining the level one helpdesk experience with the awesome training they offered would be a huge step forward into IT.

Anyway, based on anything I have researched You almost cant find a better next step than to do the Net+ then 3 MS core exams and Voila - You are an MCSA.  As someone said earlier - you can get the MCSE later on after hopefully securing a invaluable starting position.

Im new to the cert game, but I have been hiring people for the last 7 years and I really have to say that while certs are the way to get 'In' to the interview - personality and drive and honesty are so HUge when it comes to hiring.
My company in particular will always go for a great guy with a keen attitude yet only a few basic certs.
Truthfully - I have had guys come in with 'elite' certs and lots of 'insider' buzzwords and they are simply not going to get hired because we dont like them.

As to training.. I think its worth noting that many companies WANT to train a basic A+/MCSA guy who is an clean slate rather than a cert-wizard who already has his routine and prejudices.

Im going MCSE because that just happens to be the only course available to me right now. Otherwise Im sure I would do MCSA.

Just a last thing to note here - I added something to my A+ but almost no one thinks about this aspect.... Business Management diploma.  
Nothing to do with tech - everything to do with resumes/CV's and broadening the range of potential jobs.
We've had two people get hired without even writing the A+ yet because the company wanted supervisors and managers with some computer skills.  Now those two A+/Business students are the higher paid supervisors of guys with MCSE/CNA/BLA BLA.  

Crazy world Smiley
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Kasor
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« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2002, 08:55:23 PM »

After all MCSA is better than A+ and CNA.

Also is personal goal, don't let those certification value to ajust your knowledge.

Aim high, sky is the limit Smiley

Good luck
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evo_spook
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« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2002, 11:16:58 AM »

Quote
Just a last thing to note here - I added something to my A+ but almost no one thinks about this aspect.... Business Management diploma.


I'm thinking of doing something similar, just half way through A+ at the moment, hopefully, then N+ and MCSA or something, but I'm thinking of adding to it all, something in Britain called City & guilds 730-7 cert, which is a certification for teaching adults.
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xonkers
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« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2002, 01:13:40 AM »

Good call Evospook

I know this is a forum about tech certs but I wish we had a bit more talk about the other aspects that relate to the certs or at least support them.

Where I live for example every tech place is cryin out for Sales people!

Because most us techs are introverted nerds   Wink  I have known some, otherwise tech-illiterate, salesmen who simply did A+ and walked past the MCSE's and the like and right into jobs immediately.

Just some thoughts

Cheers
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Leroi
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« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2002, 11:02:32 AM »

You need the following credentials to get ahead in the market.

1.) A Degree from a recognized university (4-year is a must an MBA is better).
2.) Experience (takes time but it counts)
3.) Certifications (every one adds to your market value)

Good luck,
Leroi
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Gundyman
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« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2002, 01:36:32 PM »

A+ mean nothing! Think for real and look at the job.

It is only good to fill up the space of resume for all newbie.
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IT POWER
xonkers
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« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2002, 03:23:30 PM »

A+ is something. The space it filled on my resume was enough to get me a entry level offer from a huge tech Co. (in a tech slump)

At least it demonstrates a broad all-around knowledge or PC's from upgrading the insides to DOS through to Win2k

Unlike sayyy.. just having MCP

Cheers
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Luchnia
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« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2002, 12:40:03 PM »

You know reading these post really makes me wonder sometimes. Although, I am not overly experienced, I am not a dummy either. It just seems like some of these jobs are nuts with their requirements. They want you to be an Oracle expert and a top notch sys admin, along with running the NASA space shuttle. Actuall, even if you could, you would not have the time to do all they want as a job requirement. They want a 100 years experience and certifications out the kazoo! I wonder just who writes these adds these days.

I sent out a slew of resumes for the past 5/6 months applying for anything from help desk to astronaut, and only got one phone interview. It boggles the mind. I am committed, dedicated, an excellent people person, and above all more than conscience about business. Once I am acclimated to an environment, I can handle myself pretty well.

After all, I have been self-employed for about 30 years now. I have set up small corporations, directed a small nonprofit agency for at-risk youth, run a family, dilligently studied for certs, among a ton of other things that would take about five pages to jot down now.

It takes a lot to be able to handle your own businesses for that length of time. I handled business for around a half-million $$ back in the days when that was a ton of cash! I have learned just how many sorry employees and how many extended coffee breaks it takes to make you go flat broke. I could run most businesses that I have been applying for IT positions with.

I can only wonder how easy it is to get discouraged. I have found so many jobs, but I just don't qualify for their stringent requirements. I think they throw my resume in the folder called "trash."

Two jobs not too long ago that I applied for I felt very confident that I was a shoe-in, or at least would get a call. It was almost secretive the way they hired one of the positions. I even drove to the company to follow up and make sure my resume was well recieved. The people at the office just loved me. I think this was nothing more than an inside hire and they just had to go through the red tape and post the job. The other job just kept getting postponed.

I applied for one position and kept emailing them, and re-applying and after four months the job is still posted. They would not even answer an email, and this is a prominent firm. Wouldn't that mean that is a "dummy" position to make the recruiter look like they are hiring? This is the kind of stuff that should not be allowed to happen. It cost time and money to send resumes and emails to prospective agencies. This is just the tip of the iceberg of what I have had to deal with. I can go on and on about this stuff, but that really won't accomplish anything.

By the way, am I the only one that doesn't like deceptive practices? Well, it is interesting at any rate. Just more food for thought, I guess.

Peace up Wink
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