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Bobby Digital
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« on: April 17, 2002, 02:41:12 PM »

What is a good study book for the Linux+ exam? "Running Linux" is a good book to have by your side while learning Linux, but I am looking for something a little more test-specific.

I know that Sybex has a book and there is one from the "All-in-one" series.

Thanks.

BD
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The VMS Kid
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« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2002, 02:56:11 PM »

I used Roderick Smith's "Linux+ Study Guide" from Sybex and thought that it was excellent. It covered all areas of the test adequately except for the hardware portions, but it tried to do that as well. "Running Linux" is a great book to LEARN Linux, but I would recommend Smith's book for the test. I would also recommend using Linux for 6 months to a year on a regular basis and brishing up on hardware (especially SCSI and disks). The Linux+ I would say has like 25% hardware questions on it, many of which have little or nothing to do with Linux. So if you don't have your A+, Mike Meyers' book may come in handy as well. I got questions on the exam regarding IRQ assignments, DMA addresses and SCSI issues. So be prepared on that score. Logs and printers are covered heavily in the exam, as are general configuration knowledge and sysadmin type stuff (inetd, bash syntax, user adding, etc.). Let me know if you need any more info. Good luck on the exam.
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Bobby Digital
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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2002, 03:29:58 PM »

Thanks VMS Kid. I'll take a look at the Sybex book.

I've played around with Red Hat and Slackware, but I am nowhere near an expert. I think the Linux+ will give some basic experience to be able to work with it down the road.

BD
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Boulware5
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2002, 03:40:56 PM »

Right now I'm using the Osborne Linux+ Certification Study Guide. It seems good so far; it goes through each Linux+ objective.  Anyone else using or used it?
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The VMS Kid
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« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2002, 03:46:17 PM »

I have used Slackware, Red Hat, SuSE and Caldera. I am not an expert either, and the exam is not intended for such. Just get a good grasp of the basics and you should do OK. I would suggest taking the test soon, though, as the passing score right now is still quite low. I recall the Network+ started out that way then one day they bumped up the passing score by 14 percentage points. You might want to get this sucker out of the way before they change their minds on this one.

The test was a good measure of how well you know the important system-wide configuration files (/etc/profile, /etc/services, /etc/inetd.conf, etc.) and command line usage . . . know your pipes, redirection, and the basics of job control and background processing. I had no questions on X or installing. Mainly logging, and everyday system admin type items as well as configuring and using network services. But most of the stuff was basic . . . it was the hardware stuff that cost me most of my points, so de take care on that score.

The LPI Certifcation In A Nutshell book from O'Reilley seems to be well-loved my many if the reviews at Amazon are any indication, but Ihave heard that the LIP-1 test is more difficult as well, but that may be an idea if you are looking for another study aid. I used "Running Linux" as well as "Special Edition Using Caldera OpenLinux" to teach myself Linux, and just used the Smith book for the test. Get VERY comfy using Linux, and I think you will find that many of the questions you will have a good sense of "intuition" about even if you are not aware of the precise answer. It does help. Keep hacking with Slackware and Red Hat. The test seems to focus more on the easier to use distros like Red Hat as RPM and xinetd.conf were asked about a bit. Also know your Debian package formats. If you know your hardware and follow my suggestions, you should ace the test (I made an 800 out of a possible 9000 on the test). Best of luck to you.
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dagger
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« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2002, 05:32:45 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by Boulware5
Right now I'm using the Osborne Linux+ Certification Study Guide. It seems good so far; it goes through each Linux+ objective.  Anyone else using or used it?


Haven't had a chance to check that one out
unfortunately my local book store does not carry it.

I managed to pick up the Linux+ Bible
I used the Server+ bible for the server+ exam and did very well and passed, so I thought I'd stick to what worked and try the Linux+ Bible for the Linux+ exam.

It goes through all the Linux+ objectives
line by line. Kind of cool. I have not taken the exam yet (but will soon).
I'll post how I do.

I might pick up the Exam Cram book as well
since it's 70% off. Can't go wrong there.
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RBud
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« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2002, 06:24:14 PM »

I read both the Exam Cram and the Linux+ Bible . I would recommend the Linux+ Bible   for the exam.
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The VMS Kid
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« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2002, 07:48:01 AM »

One thing I did note at the bookstore when I was looking through the books . . . . Jeff Durham's book . . . the "All-In-One-Guide" for the Linux+, does have a large "Server+ Short Course" at the end of the book. This baffled me at first, but after having the test and seeing how heavy it went on the hardware, it might prove more useful than many other guides, as well as a way to get started on the Server+ after the Linux test. I did not really use that book, but I just thought that I would mention it in case anyone was thinking of it.
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dagger
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2002, 08:36:54 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by The VMS Kid
One thing I did note at the bookstore when I was looking through the books . . . . Jeff Durham's book . . . the "All-In-One-Guide" for the Linux+, does have a large "Server+ Short Course" at the end of the book. This baffled me at first, but after having the test and seeing how heavy it went on the hardware, it might prove more useful than many other guides, as well as a way to get started on the Server+ after the Linux test. I did not really use that book, but I just thought that I would mention it in case anyone was thinking of it.


Actually according to the Linux+ exam blueprint, the exam goes in to some detail on more A+ related topics rather then Server+.

It's Domain 7.0 on the blueprint,
and it covers 19% on the exam.

You can get the official exam blueprint here:
http://www.comptia.org/certification/linuxplus/all_about_linuxplus.htm

Click on the Objectives link.

For all the books available for this exam,
go to Amazon.com and in a search type: Linux+

Every Linux+ study guide will be displayed.
Read the reviews and make a decision from there. For example the Linux+ All-in-One has only 2 1/2 stars out of 5 from reviews and supposedly the Sybex Linux+ study guide is missing the hardware section completely.

I find Amazon.com is good place to start
doing your research for a good study guide.
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The VMS Kid
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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2002, 08:57:49 AM »

I do as well. I don't use Amazon very much to buy stuff, but the review sure are handy. Smiley
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Boulware5
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« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2002, 11:38:25 AM »

About the exam cram book...It's been 2 weeks and I haven't reveived it yet!  I got it right from the Corlis site for 70% off, but it's taking forever.
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dagger
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« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2002, 11:57:06 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by Boulware5
About the exam cram book...It's been 2 weeks and I haven't reveived it yet!  I got it right from the Corlis site for 70% off, but it's taking forever.


Its probably because of the sale,
I bet they have thousands of books
to ship.

I can see that slowing things down.
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Boulware5
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« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2002, 04:53:39 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by dagger


Its probably because of the sale,
I bet they have thousands of books
to ship.

I can see that slowing things down.



Just got it today. Smiley
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