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Author Topic: 7 months in and no luck with breaking into I.T  (Read 5694 times)
nadimaj
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« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2001, 08:52:00 AM »

Maybe it's to do with the colour of my skin. Sad :confused: Sad
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limsam
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« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2001, 12:24:06 AM »

HI

Do not feel disheartened. Discrimination is everywhere.

It may be color in UK. But it is worse in many Asian countries. (Singapore is an exception.)

In many Asian countries, you need INFLUENCE to get a job. You need a know person, or local politicians letter to get a job. Or you have to bribe to get a job.

I suffered a lot in a Middle east country to find a job because, I am not from the big country where all the executives, HR managers come from!! I walked from shop to shop holding my CV in my armpit. The most frustrating days in my life.

In my view, all forms of discrimination should be condemned.

OK I come back.

Try hard. Be patient. Build your skills. Keep on applying. And write 'some white lies' in the CV. Since everybody does it, you also have to do it.
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Sadly, it is not what you know. It is who you know!
jackiechan
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« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2001, 01:06:42 AM »

If you are in the minority, you have to work harder, be smarter, more skilled to get anywhere.
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Cosmonaut
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« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2001, 09:49:13 AM »

Well it sounds like you have a good foundation but your C.V. as you all call it, needs a little re-wording. Instead of PC Support Person, use Specialist, and instead of Web Ad Taker, say something else. By the way what does C.V. stand for? I just call it a Resume. Your resume needs to flow off thier tounges, read it aloud a couple of times. Also leave off your Hobbies and Interests, Personal Profile, skill set and the list of exams.  You can put a completion date for your MCSE but until then, they don't care. Those will cut your resume down to size. These days the managers and CIOs are in such a hurry to weed out those resumes that take to long to read, its better that your resume is no more than 2 pages. Anyways, that's just my two cents!

Here's my resume, my isn't anything special either.
http://www.frenchfryart.com/resume
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Drummer
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« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2001, 10:32:49 AM »

First, "CV" stands for Curriculum Vitae which is about the same thing as a resume. I know what it means but I prefer "resume" myself. Call it what it is, I say. Smiley That wouldn't keep you from getting a job in my book though.

Actually, I recruit for a company that trains people and then hires them so I'm mostly selling the training program but I'm also looking for people who would be a good fit for the company. I would agree that the "CV" is fine but I would definitely rather see the two page version in an interview. I'm usually just scanning for stuff and I don't have time to read through four pages or so. Also, don't put stuff on there that has nothing to do with the situation. I had a young guy with an MCSE put on his resume "spent three years working  as a farm hand". Smiley Sometimes you can have too much stuff there.

In the interview, I love people who have good attitudes. We want "team players" in the company and I'm looking for people who are open to different occupational options. If their dream job is not available, I want the people to be willing to do something else until theirs opens up.

Also, we require that everyone be certified in the company. I interviewed a few people who genuinely turned me off because as soon as I said "You've got great experience but we need people with ________ " I got looks from them like they were sucking on lemons. Everyone has different criteria. Don't tell me what or who I should be hiring. If you don't like what I'm saying, then see ya.

So enthusiasm is the big thing. That and flexibility. If you have enthusiastic people who are open to challenges then you have people who can help your company.

I don't have any biases against people of color, partly since I'm one myself. If anything, I might be biased in favor of a group of people because I know they have a strong background and will work hard more than likely.
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« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2001, 10:35:03 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by Cosmonaut
Also leave off your Hobbies and Interests, Personal Profile, skill set and the list of exams.  You can put a completion date for your MCSE but until then, they don't care.  


I agree with your post for the most part but I do like to see the skill set and especially the list of exams. That's just the way my company is though. The rest of your post was on the money.
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Kasor
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« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2001, 10:37:16 AM »

Haven't u thinking looking for other P/T or any other jobs.

IT market is bad for entry level. There are many competition.

Good Luck
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kmarcus
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« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2001, 11:10:38 AM »

have you thougt about crossing the pond and looking for a job in the Washington, DC area?  It is a hotbed for IT professionals and there are many jobs available.  Try looking at http://www.washingtonpost.com and see for yourself.  I worked for the US Navy for 14 years and there was never a shortage of IT professionals who were contracted to support all the government agencies.  Good Luck!
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stevem5000
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« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2001, 11:22:24 AM »

Here is a different approach...

Find the book..."What Color is your Parachute?"...

Yeah, I know ...dumb title...but I first ran into this book in the early '70's...and over the years it has become one of the most popular job changing books in the industry...It's updated every 2-3 years...you can buy a copy at your local bookstore...or better...borrow it at your local public library...

This book is filled with techniques, tips and ideas on the PROCESS of changing jobs...

I have used some of the info several times in my career and most of the time it works very well...(I'm 58 and made a move into the IT industry just 4 years ago after spending about 35 years in the photographic industry)...

I have owned and built 3 businesses over the years and have probably hired over 100 people...

My three criterias in hiring is... attitude...then attitude...and finally attitude...After I make a judgement that this person would be a good "fit" in my organization, then I look at what that person can do for my business...and I assume I will have to teach him most of what he needs to know in order to do the job...

My own experience in the midwest is that most hiring personel in large companies are a**holes...they have been Peter Principled into their current job with no future...and they take their frustrations out on applicants...

I got into this industry by starting out with short term contracting...it gave me a wide range of experience...and I had NO certifications...

The current economy is not going to help...lot's of big organizations are still laying off and it will probably continue thru the first quarter...

But even so...keep trying...don't give up...

Let us know what happens...
Steve
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lakesidedrive
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« Reply #24 on: December 21, 2001, 11:47:41 AM »

Well, Nadimaj, the problem is that there are no jobs to speak of in this field.  And what few jobs are left will soon disappear as the industry gets rid of glitches and other problems and as the whole thing becomes more and more automated.  The reason that we hear of techs making so much money is that the one's that are working are really very good at what they do, but even they will soon be out of work. May I recommend some other field of work?
We're all on the same boat.
Best of luck.
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Nicole
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« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2001, 12:41:49 PM »

It's quite normal to have your personal info on a CV.  The US seems to be the biggest exception, mostly because of anti-discrimination laws, and in the US you should never put things like your marital status or age on a resume.  I have a feeling your 2-page version is probably right on the money.

I wouldn't jump to the conclusion that's it's all race discrimination.  I *have* been hearing about increased tensions in the UK in the past couple of years toward people of Pakistani/Indian/etc. descent, but not everyone you send a resume to is going to see your name and decide they don't want to hire a 'furiner.'

Enjoy the holidays and then hit the pavement hard right after New Years.  Talk to everyone you know about who they might know that's hiring, and try to get some informational interviews.  Get a haircut and a new interview suit or do whatever it takes to get you psyched and ready to get a job -- the attitude difference will show!
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miguelferrer
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« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2001, 12:47:13 PM »

Are you nuts posting a pilot license in your resume???
have you hear about discrimination...
have you hear about what happend in NY??
update your resume to more carefully reflect
the moment..
regards
M
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bearing
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« Reply #27 on: December 21, 2001, 01:55:49 PM »

miguelferrer,

Please, what the hell have you been smoking?
You must have some seriously warped mind to start thinking down those lines. Remarks like these are not needed, nadimaj has a pilots license, so what!, I don't think people are so shallow as to disregard his CV by linking his background with a pilot's license, apart from you that is...
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Angelia
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« Reply #28 on: December 21, 2001, 02:00:11 PM »

Pounding the pavement is rough...been there...Have you tried http://www.bizcorp.cjb.net...it's an on-line contracting service where you bid on jobs...(there are other sites, as well, but this is the one I use)...most of it is done via e-mail, PMB, and courier service (FedEx, etc).  You do have to register and pay a fee ($25 USD/month Basic Service), but it might help you get a little cash in your pocket and more independent experience.  The contracts are awarded all over the world, from Web site design to application development to DB building and administration.  Good luck and hang in there...
Ciao
Angelia
:cool:
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JimHalliday
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« Reply #29 on: December 21, 2001, 02:17:08 PM »

I have been an IT manager for 14 years.

When reviewing job applications, the HR team may have several hundred or thousands of CV's to read.  You must catch their attention immediatly or your CV will be cast aside.

I believe your CV lacks initial impact.  I would move your personal details after your career history and let them read the good stuff first.  

Your personal profile needs some punch to make potential employers want to read on.  You may find some good quotes from any written reviews with your former employers.  You could say some thing like:

"A highly motivated and quick thinking Information Technology Support Engineer with a natural talent for computing, who thrives under preasure and is a strong team player.  Although having a short professional career, has demonstrated exceptional IT skills and proven that he will go the extra mile to ensure the success of all tasks assigned to him."
(Please modify and enhance to suit your circumstances and the facts.)

I would suggest that at your level of experience, being a 'team player' is probably more important than the 'ability to work alone'.

The next point that your CV says to me is that you are unemployed - this is not a good thing! You say that you carried out unpaid IT work for some time - I would include this if it is relevant, but you don't have to say you weren't paid.

I would focus more on your personal major acheivements with each of the companies stating in more detail exactly what you did and how your personnal effort benefitted your employer and the customers.

Don't include anything that is not relevant to the job you are applying for. e.g. Pilots Licence!

Good luck.
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