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Achtung
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« on: August 12, 2001, 01:51:28 PM »

I am currently following the CIW Site Designer courses in the hope of breaking into the Web Designing market. But the failures of the dot-coms and even some of the until-recently well-established IT firms have got me thinking... Is a career in Web designing viable ?? How are the opportunities worldwide ?? Any opinions ?? :confused:
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Sotet
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« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2001, 05:25:11 PM »

I think the best approach with web design would be to do freelance - that's my attempt at this time.

Web design is still in demand, it's just employers can be more selective, asking for people with higher skill sets, such as database knowledge paired with programming skills.

I have been server (backend) support and I prefer design, so what I am doing now is building a profolio on my own time. I approach people with websites which need a total update and ask to do it for free, then later, after I have a profolio, I will start charging. As of now, I have redesigned 4 sites.

I'm trying to learn Photoshop better now.
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Achtung
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« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2001, 07:20:19 AM »

hey sotet....i think you're right...i guess any employer will want to see proof of your capabilities so building a personal portfolio is the ideal solution.

What have you done so far....any Urls ??! Smiley
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BootData
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« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2001, 12:48:09 PM »

just to add to the discussion:
ideally employers (I think) are looking for person who are well skilled in database, programming, content-management and arts (graphic design).
but I dont think that one person could possess all these skills mentioned above.
rule of thumb: a programmer (coder) can't do graphics; designer cant code - but this might not apply for everyone
:p

what u guys think on this?
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Nicole
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« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2001, 01:44:48 PM »

I think a good web team includes the designer, handling graphics design, site layout, basic HTML and in general translating what the client wants into a physical design.  The other member of the team is adept in JAVA, CGI, PHP, Perl, or whatever backend technology is needed.  Obviously, bigger projects require larger teams.  

There are a few talented souls that can truly handle both ends of the equation, but most "web designers" tend to either outsource the programming aspects or avoid the complex tech issues in favor of simpler solutions.  Not a bad idea, IMHO: if it can be avoided, by all means do so.  But if you really NEED the technology, then go for it.  I hate websites full of bandwidth-hogging crap that serve no purpose other than to feed some programmer's ego.  Cheesy

On the other end of the spectrum, I have a friend that's a great graphic designer, who occasionally gets web business.  Although pretty, her web sites are poorly optimized and inefficient.  She simply lacks the technical background to even begin addressing (or recognizing) these issues, and is hired by folks who don't need or understand anything more.

You don't need to be a whiz at any aspect (except, of course, your specialty), but you should be well-versed in the tech you may come across.  A web site organized around a database is going to have database pros in-house.  Their Webmaster doesn't need to be a pro, but s/he should understand the basics of online databases, and needs to be able to work with them effectively.

On a different subject:
The failure of the dot coms does not necessarily equal a lack of web design opportunities.  Traditional companies also need a web presence, and are far more likely to focus on content and presentation than gimmicks and flashy design.
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cassie
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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2001, 12:52:54 AM »

IMHO, a great team for building web sites for small businesses would be a PRAGMATIC teccie, i.e. one that is able to focus on useability not just using high tech for the sake of it, and someone with an eye for layout/design. I've found these skills are often not very compatible to find in one person.

What do you think?

Cassie
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Achtung
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2001, 06:38:13 AM »

Personally i think that the young programmers are the ones who are keen on displaying their new found hi-tech skills in the web sites....but with time and experience that tendency will die down i think. Cos the veterens know that functionality and usability dont not equal complexity !! IMHO !! Smiley

And i think Nicole is right about there still being scope for web designers....but i dont think any company is gonna blindly jump onto the cyber bandwagon for some time....too many wounded in too short a time !
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Crutch
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« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2001, 01:29:08 AM »

You know, I've actually seen an increase in demand for web people.  But the real point is that traditional markets aren't the ones in need.  I do alot of network consulting in and around the state of NM.  Many of our clients want a web presence and, more importantly, an e-commerce site.  We always outsource this development because it's not what we do, nor do we have the time.

I think the Techie world is changing.  More often than not, we are seeing marketing depts, not IT, developing the content for web design.  My present employer and the one before this gig, use their Marketing dept to develop the websites.  Why?  'Cause it's really marketing, at its core.

So, as techies, we need to evolve to fill the demand.  If you want to become a web designer, take some classes on marketing or business.  It can't hurt and will definitely help in the long run.
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« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2001, 02:34:25 AM »

"take some courses on marketing ..."

I couldn't agree with you more!! A lot of teccies I've worked with would gain greatly from doing so.
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Trouble Man
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« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2001, 09:29:14 PM »

Compared to the rest of the IT job market, web design is still a hot commodity, at least here in South Florida - programming and database management, too.  Take a look at dice.com, flipdog.com, monster.com, ect.  There are some in Miami and Ft. Lauderdale looking for entry level, that just ask for basic web design knowledge.
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