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Author Topic: which Programming language?  (Read 5127 times)
adam salam
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« on: August 26, 2005, 10:19:41 AM »

Hi there

I need your help to choose a programming language that can be more practical and help me in my career after MSCE, and CCNA

I have no experience in programming, though I know how to edit html and little bit JavaScript.

Some of my friends advice me to learn a database programming such as Oracle or SQL; that will support my network and systems knowledge

Is it possible to learn programming without attending a class?
Cause I am working 6 days a week 9 hours daily, and the other problem the lack of enough money!!!

How can I get the basics of programming without the need to attending a class? Is there any frees resources?

Any reply is greatly appreciated.
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Adam
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« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2005, 03:15:26 PM »

I would suggest learning Java . . . it has a greater level of platform independence than most other languages and is relatively easy to learn. Yes, you can learn on your own but you have to be pretty determined. Just get a book, join an online study group and start trying stuff. maybe get involved ion some project at Sourceforge that needs cdoders. You can use Java for database programming as long as you supplement it with a little SQL.

Go to http://sun.java.com and download the JDK and install it on your computer (it's free). Then buy a book like "Beginning Java 2" by Schildt and start coding. It's easier than C/C++ and it makes network programming substantially easier.

there is a free online book called "Thinking In Java" located here:

http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/

and there is a yahoo support club for it located here:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JavaThink/

Good Luck.
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adam salam
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« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2005, 08:33:20 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by Farrell
I would suggest learning Java . . . it has a greater level of platform independence than most other languages and is relatively easy to learn. Yes, you can learn on your own but you have to be pretty determined. Just get a book, join an online study group and start trying stuff. maybe get involved ion some project at Sourceforge that needs cdoders. You can use Java for database programming as long as you supplement it with a little SQL.

Go to http://sun.java.com and download the JDK and install it on your computer (it's free). Then buy a book like "Beginning Java 2" by Schildt and start coding. It's easier than C/C++ and it makes network programming substantially easier.

there is a free online book called "Thinking In Java" located here:

http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/

and there is a yahoo support club for it located here:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JavaThink/

Good Luck.


Thank you very much
I appreciate you advices and links:)
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« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2005, 10:43:25 AM »

Be warned though, this will take a *lot* of work and effort. But you need no instruction or expenditure to become good at it. Just practice. Good luck.
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aznluvsmc
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« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2005, 01:17:17 AM »

I personally suggest a class.  I find most programming books don't do a good job of reinforcing the concepts learned through programming exercises.  Taking a class will force you to practice learned concepts.  Another point is that by taking a class you will see different angles of approaching problems and the more code you get exposed to the better off you'll be.

But if you don't have the time to do a class, then self-study is your only real option.  As other previously mentioned you will have to be completely determined as this is much harder than networking.  

I personally recommend you study C, C++ and then Perl and VB (for Windows admin).  Although C/C++ may not necessarily help you in networking it will provide a solid foundation to move to other languages.
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kool_gall1991
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2005, 04:44:04 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by aznluvsmc
I personally suggest a class.  I find most programming books don't do a good job of reinforcing the concepts learned through programming exercises.  Taking a class will force you to practice learned concepts.  Another point is that by taking a class you will see different angles of approaching problems and the more code you get exposed to the better off you'll be.

But if you don't have the time to do a class, then self-study is your only real option.  As other previously mentioned you will have to be completely determined as this is much harder than networking.  

I personally recommend you study C, C++ and then Perl and VB (for Windows admin).  Although C/C++ may not necessarily help you in networking it will provide a solid foundation to move to other languages.


Is it reallt better to learn C/C++ than Java nowadays?
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TheShadow
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« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2005, 03:46:15 AM »

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Originally posted by kool_gall1991
Is it reallt better to learn C/C++ than Java nowadays?


A year ago I would have said no.  but not now.  C/C++ with take you across the entire spectrum and make you ready for C# if you must.  Java takes you into Sun's playpen to which many are escaping from.  Now that IBM is on the Linux kick Java everywhere is being downplayed, Novell is on the Linux kick, Apple is Linux in a shroud; Java seems less a sure thing. Anything embedded still has a great C/C++ following.  When in doubt stick to the fundamentals and that is C/C++ with VB as a backup.
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kool_gall1991
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« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2005, 10:55:56 AM »

ok, thanks, cause they were wanting to teach us java at school and i wanted to now whether to stick with it or try another language.
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« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2005, 05:59:27 PM »

Good to know that there are users here who can give valuable advice and not just "follow the mainstream" recommendations.
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