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compu_net
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« on: November 18, 2004, 01:38:20 PM »

For remote access, when saying ISDN, does that mean we use telephone number to connect, and stop using TCP/IP, or that we are using TCP/IP over the existing telephone service?

The reason for my question is that one IT professional told me we can use only ISDN for remote access, without any other technology support!!!
So the client calls remote server using telephone number and that‘«÷s all!!!
Think VPN v. ISDN Huh
Please, can anybody flood some light here?
« Last Edit: November 18, 2004, 01:57:56 PM by compu_net » Logged
curiousgeorge
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2005, 03:55:37 AM »

that explanation was clear as mud John.

You will still be using TCP/IP as your protocol and you will still be dialing into your RAS server. ISDN, T1, OC48, Cable, or Dial-up are only physical connections that have different levels of bandwidth and different ways of accessing the internet (an "always on" connection or dialing into an ISP).

An ISDN line is digital, while a standard phone line is analog. You must contact your local phone company to have an ISDN line installed. If you have a single line today, or plan to upgrade your second phone line to ISDN, your existing wiring should support ISDN.

An ISDN line consists of multiple channels. Unlike a standard phone line, an ISDN line can carry more than one call at a time, so you can have both your computer and telephone connected to the same line.

An ISDN connection to the Internet uses an ISDN terminal adapter (also called an ISDN digital modem). A standard phone line connects to the Internet with an analogue modem.

Typically, an ISDN line is going to replace two analog phone lines, so if you have a line for your phone and a line for the computer or fax machine, one ISDN line replaces both of those lines.

An ISDN circuit consists of two digital channels, each of which can either be used as a voice call, or a digital computer call. If the 2nd line is not in use on a voice call, both channels can be bonded to provide a single 128 Kb/sec channel.

A 128 Kb bonded channel is about 2.7 times as fast as a perfect analog modem connection, and much faster than that in "real life" applications.

v.90 modems are only 33.6 Kb/sec inbound into the internet, while a 2B ISDN connection is 128 Kb/sec in both directions - so the inbound (upload) about 4 times as fast as a v.90 modem.


Hope that helps.
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compu_net
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« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2005, 04:15:21 PM »

Thanks for the flood of information Smiley

Let‘«÷s go further in this matter, if possible Wink

I have a real scenario in my work place Sad

A small network

- 20 windows xp clients,

- 2 windows server 2003, one of them is configured as RRAS server to accept VPN or any kind of remote access methods,

- All connected to the internet through a D-Link ISDN router, I think model DI-306.

I am trying to establish a Remote Access connection from my home to our work place LAN.

From our LAN I could connect to the RRAS server using VPN, from any client.
But when trying to do that from my home:
First I try to call telephone number of the ISDN router using dialup connection, I received

error 676: the phone line is busy.

Even the router configured to accept dial-in remote access!!!

Could you please share your experience here Smiley

I am appreciating any input in this challenge Sad

Thank you
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BearyAnn
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2005, 05:34:52 PM »

Don't know if this helps any, but we used ISDN to connect remote offices to main server. Not used as a dial in from home. It was a direct connection.  Had to have a separate modem line for user dial in.

For those with internet connection using VPN is the better choice: no phone lines tied up; several may access at one time.
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compu_net
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« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2005, 06:04:29 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by BearyAnn
Don't know if this helps any, but we used ISDN to connect remote offices to main server. Not used as a dial in from home. It was a direct connection.  Had to have a separate modem line for user dial in.

For those with internet connection using VPN is the better choice: no phone lines tied up; several may access at one time.


Thanks that flood some light here Smiley

one thing is to use a seprate phone line dedicated for dialIn user, right?
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BearyAnn
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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2005, 06:05:56 PM »

A separate line for dial in users. Yes.
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compu_net
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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2005, 07:50:13 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by BearyAnn
A separate line for dial in users. Yes.



but, how can more than one user dial in  to the same telephone number?
It should be busy if another user is already dial in, how can I solve that problem?

another thing, in my network place, As I told you, our network connected to the interent using ISDN line and ISDN router, and I have heard that ISDN can accept more than on call at the same time, why that gave me a BUSY signal?

error 676: the phone line is busy.

!!!

when tring to dial in from home!!!
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« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2005, 04:29:36 PM »

It sounds like the culprit is the ISDN modem. Make sure it is configured correctly.
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« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2005, 07:34:13 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by curiousgeorge
It sounds like the culprit is the ISDN modem. Make sure it is configured correctly.


After my highly appreciation for your efforts to help me, in fact I am disappointed Sad

I couldn't make it work; I give you our infrastructure layout and please give me you proposition so I can access W3k RRAS server:
« Last Edit: February 24, 2005, 07:39:47 AM by compu_net » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2005, 04:02:12 PM »

The infrastructure setup is standard. You need to refer to the settings on the ISDN router. I am sure they have manuals on the manufacturer's website. If not, call the manufacturer's tech support.

Since you can connect to the server from the LAN but you are not getting your modem to answer a phone call, my best guess is the ISDN router isn't configured correctly.
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2005, 06:20:24 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by curiousgeorge
The infrastructure setup is standard. You need to refer to the settings on the ISDN router. I am sure they have manuals on the manufacturer's website. If not, call the manufacturer's tech support.

Since you can connect to the server from the LAN but you are not getting your modem to answer a phone call, my best guess is the ISDN router isn't configured correctly.


Well, I am thinking about connecting the RRAS server directly to the Internet using an ISDN adapter, I think that will eliminate the hassle of configuring that D-link router, but I am afraid that will make RRAS server with pare legs to the internet!!!
 What do you think?
 does RRAS server has a built-in firewall that can neglect the need for that router?
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compu_net
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« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2005, 10:41:15 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by compu_net
Well, I am thinking about connecting the RRAS server directly to the Internet using an ISDN adapter, I think that will eliminate the hassle of configuring that D-link router, but I am afraid that will make RRAS server with pare legs to the internet!!!
 What do you think?
 does RRAS server has a built-in firewall that can neglect the need for that router?



I tried to move my RRAS 2003 server to DMZ but after a couple of minutes, told me that it will shutdown in a few minutes Sad  , could be WORM???
« Last Edit: March 09, 2005, 11:32:52 AM by compu_net » Logged
compu_net
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« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2005, 04:21:28 AM »

Seems to me SLEEPY FORUM: ZZZzzz.......go ahead ZZZZzzzz.......:mad:
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