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EN4CER
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« on: September 05, 2004, 10:11:08 AM »

I will be setting up a Windows 2003 Small Business Server running AD.

The domain will consist of 10 workstations and a printer.

The currently just have 2 workstation that connects to the internet wirelessly using a Netgear 54g router/modem. This router does DHCP and NAT.

My questions is, when i set up the domain, should i continue to allow the router to give DHCP, fix the router and servers address? or

Allow the server to provide all DHCP?

Please could some explain the pros and cons of each method and wheich one is best to go with?

Many thanks in advance Smiley
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em_ar_ducks
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2004, 06:54:31 PM »

1. I assume the company has a registered domain name, if not you should consider that before you go too much further as anything you do from this point on will be impacted by that decision. (there are some clever ways to get around this, but for a business I wouldn't recommend them)

2. With a small network such as SBS I would use static assignments on all addresses, including the router. (you could also use a static assignment on the router, disable DHCP on the router, and allow SBS to be the DHCP server.)

3. Since the current connection is via a netgear router it sounds like using a registered domain is not part of the plan. Assuming you do not go forward with a registered domain name, make sure that your AD domain is using a non-registered naming scheme (ie. "mydomain.local").

4. you will need to set up DNS on your DC (SBS computer)such that it uses the DNS' of your ISP as forwarders (the settings should be in the router), while the DC/DNS performs all of the local resolution. Make sure that all of your workstations use the DC/DNS/SBS machine as their resolver, also make sure that the SBS machine points to itself.

This scenario will allow "outbound" access to the INTERNET only. If you need to allow INTERNET users to access your network (such as a WEBSERVER), you will need to do more work and SBS may not be your best choice by itself. The good news is that SBS 2003 can interact with a "real" AD domain.

Most important thing it to have your DNS architecture and your connectivity requirements to the INTERNET well thought out before configure AD.
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EN4CER
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« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2004, 07:39:56 PM »

Thanks ducks for that well thought out and drafted reply. That has given me some real food for thought...

They don't currently own a domain or one that they know the details of, so i am in the process of costing one for them.

I understand they wish to use the MS Exchange built into SBS for centralization of e-mails.  So i guess a Domain name and some hosted pop3 e-mail accounts will come in handy. Am i right?


Once again i thank u
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