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felix7
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« on: August 16, 2004, 09:07:14 AM »

Anyone know the answer to this question ..


A staff gives you a removable media with NTFS on it. You need to change the permissions on it so that Mary can access it.  Mary should NOT be allowed to modify anything on the media.  What should you do?

A. Take control over the media, and grant her Red and execute permission
B. Format the media, and grant her Read and execute permission
C. Change the media to dynamic state, and grant her Read and execute permission
D. Change the media to static state, and grant her Read and execute permission
E.  You cannot do this
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6slave6
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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2004, 10:12:54 AM »

I think E.  I don't think removable media is ever NTFS
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yang11
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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2004, 08:30:19 PM »

A,
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wayne62682
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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2004, 09:53:46 PM »

I say E.  I never heard of any kind of removable media that could be formatted as NTFS.  I don't think hot-swap hard drives count.  However, if they do, then I think it would be A.

It's definatly not B.  I don't think changing the disk to dynamic has anything to do with it, so that eliminates C.  And I think there's no such thing as a "static" drive (it's either dynamic or it's not.  It's not specifically called a "Static Disk", and even it is called that, the disk is "static" to begin with) so that gets rid of D.
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battlewagon
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« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2004, 01:52:28 PM »

Just for info, zip drives can be formatted NTFS
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6slave6
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« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2004, 02:46:00 PM »

Really??  You know you learn something every day.
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Jbleakley
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« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2004, 05:48:48 AM »

removable media cannot be dynamic.
If it is large enough  e.g 80GB external HDD then yes it could easily be NTFS.
I would say A.
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Luchnia
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« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2004, 01:03:40 PM »

Hopefully you could change the acls with admin privs it seems they are different. Here is the low-down from Microslop:

This update resolves the "Non-Administrative User Cannot Access Removable Media After NTFS Format" issue in Windows 2000 and is discussed in Microsoft Knowledge Base (KB) Article Q269013. Download now to ensure that Windows 2000 sets the appropriate Access Control Lists (ACLs) for the NTFS file system.

When a user formats a disk in a removable hard drive with the NTFS file system, and the computer has the "allowed to eject removable NTFS media" group policy applied, Windows 2000 does not set the appropriate ACLs to grant non-administrative users access to the disk. As a result, a non-administrative user may be denied access to removable media (such as an Iomega Jaz disk, or other removable hard drives). A non-administrative user who formats the drive will not have authority to change the inappropriate ACLs, and will be denied access to the disk.

For more information on this vulnerability, read Microsoft Knowledge Base Article Q269013
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6slave6
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« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2004, 12:46:11 PM »

Thanks Luchnia... that was a good read.
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ajamu
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« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2004, 07:09:43 AM »

The answer is A.
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Compbck
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« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2004, 10:47:16 AM »

For those pondering over whether or not you can format removable media with NTFS, you first need to know what sort of media we are talking about.

The MCDST 70-271 Question does not state this and we must therefore assume that they are referring to a floppy diskett. If that is the case Microsoft state that floppies MUST be formatted with FAT, because NTFS takes up too much space.

On the other hand if they had specified Jaz/Zip media, these can be formatted with NTFS.

The question refers to Windows XP and therefore the reference to the Windows 2000 patch is not really relevant for this question.

In conclusion, this is trick question, and when answering any of these certification questions, one should not go looking beyond the most obvious of solutions - It's a floppy and the answer is (E). NO YOU CANNOT DO THIS
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rofarril
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« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2004, 02:36:00 PM »

Why do I have to assume it is a floppy? The Win XP Resource Kit says:

"Although NTFS is the preferred file system for hard disks, Windows XP Professional uses FAT12 when you format floppy disks and FAT32 when you format DVD-RAM discs. For removable media that can be ejected unexpectedly, you must use FAT16 or FAT32. NTFS is disabled for some removable media because NTFS does not flush data to the disk immediately, and removing NTFS-formatted media without using the Safe Removal application can result in data loss.

If you do not plan on removing the media and want to use NTFS, you can change the Safe Removal policy.

To enable NTFS on removable media:

In Device Manager, right-click the device, and then click Properties.
On the Policies tab, click Optimize for performance."
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Looneytoon
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« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2004, 03:33:09 PM »

Hint: the question begins with "A staff gives you a removable media with NTFS on it"
Because a Staff can't give you something which cannot exist, you may assume that this is a working media and therefore not a floppy.
Conclusion: I think that the assumption of Compbck is wrong (and thus is E wrong).
B is obviously wrong and "Dynamic and static state" has nothing to do with setting rights (C and D).
Leaves answer A to be the correct one.
Greetz...
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jradsta6
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« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2005, 12:58:00 PM »

I hate to bear bad news but the answer is D you can not assume certain things on these test you have to use the info they give you. Heck for all you know it could be a removable hard drive. So you must first change the media to static state for boot reasons, then grant the permissions;)
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Compbck
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« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2005, 02:05:55 PM »

Jratsta6, I love bad news if it results in us all getting the correct solution to the problem posed in the question.

Thank you very much for your contribution, which also differs to others in this little gathering.

Healthy argument is great.
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