pharaoh fortune slot
ExamNotes.net
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 23, 2017, 04:08:48 PM

Login with username, password and session length
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  ExamNotes.net
|-+  General discussions
| |-+  Programming Forum
| | |-+  Where should I start in programming
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Print
Author Topic: Where should I start in programming  (Read 9465 times)
mikop
Supa SUPA MAN!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2250

2


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2004, 12:24:25 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by azimuth40

As far as cost bring up a cheap Linux box for 100 bucks and download a distribution and all the tools are free.  Use the tools in text mode and learn the basics or learn that programming is not for you.


As I mentioned in the other post, there are quite many alternative even in windows world.
it is just like notepad vs dreamweaver. I don't see it being a problem or a reason to go html over a more traditional programming approach.

If you need a commercial package, then you prolly utilize the included library and are making commercial products, then I don't see it being an issue of paying for Visual Studio and other commercial packages.

I don't find C/C++ difficult. At least in learning the mechanics of it. How you translate that into something practical is another issue but then again, if one can't do it with c/c++, then they just won't cut it and will be caught up with the simpiest loop.

I also like what said az... I always say to myself that others are no smarter than I am. In the case where they are smarter, then I can compensate by working harder. I don't look for reason to fail, I look for reason to succeed. I follow my superiors and others who I identify to be worthy of my emulation, to identify reasons for their success etc. I don't try to be the bum who has it easy at the office.
Logged

"Any fool can know. The point is to understand."
                              --- Einstein
dmaftei
Senior Member
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2156

1


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2004, 09:48:55 AM »

Quote
Originally posted by azimuth40
some type of scripting is always included

A novel in which a character recites a few poems is still prose, not poetry.
Logged

BSEE, MSCS
www.maftei.net
azimuth40
Senior Member
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2073

0


View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2004, 03:27:46 PM »

hmmm OK Wink
Logged
iggy4270
Seriously
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 870

2


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2004, 12:00:53 AM »

python
Logged

Learn the rules so you can break them properly...
Dr. C
Senior Member
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 331

0


View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2004, 12:21:03 PM »

HTML is not a programming language. Nonetheless I find it a good place to start. Not leastwise because it gives you a good jumping off-point to begin doing some simple scripting . . . you can often get somebody doing HTML, and soon enough they will discover that they want to do something thay HTML can't do, so they will naturally have to extend their skill set. From that point, learning some JavaScript or PHP or VBScript . . . all easy languages, will come naturally sunce it helps you do what you need to get done. I think teaching someone C/C++/Java or assembly as a first language is too complicated. I find that this puts off more students than it helps. Python would also be a good choice to start with. But from my experience, when you force feed C to someone, they usually end up dropping it because of its complexity. After they are pretty good programemrs, they will enjoy the flexibility and power of C or the usefulness of Java, but starting them out there in this day I find is a mistake. I also find C and assembly easy, but I have been using them for almost 20 years. For newcomers, the case is different.
Logged

Nothing says "I Love You" like Corrugated Aluminum.
DaDnDe
Senior Member
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 917

0


View Profile WWW
« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2004, 01:03:41 PM »

i dont claim that HTML is programming simply because it isnt.

not even close really, but it does contain some of the elements necessary to program successfully. Add some CSS and Javascript and it resembles programming even more.

but HTML is nothing but a type of Word Processing for the net. Instead of icons to click on for formatting tricks, you must code it by hand. But because of the exact syntax required to make the code work, it resembles programming in the way that attention to detail is required.

it is an area where one single character out of place will render the entire page completely different then one would expect.

it is also something that any computer already has the tools to perform. all you need is a text editor.

to learn any other program will almost certainly require additional stuff. now whether it costs $100 or $10, it will still cost.

also finding syntax errors are similiar whether you are using a markup, script or a compiler.
Logged

"Nuchi du takara"
"Life is a treasure"

http://www.besttests.com
Dr. C
Senior Member
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 331

0


View Profile WWW
« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2004, 01:12:42 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by DaDnDe
i dont claim that HTML is programming simply because it isnt.

not even close really, but it does contain some of the elements necessary to program successfully. Add some CSS and Javascript and it resembles programming even more.

but HTML is nothing but a type of Word Processing for the net. Instead of icons to click on for formatting tricks, you must code it by hand. But because of the exact syntax required to make the code work, it resembles programming in the way that attention to detail is required.

it is an area where one single character out of place will render the entire page completely different then one would expect.

it is also something that any computer already has the tools to perform. all you need is a text editor.

to learn any other program will almost certainly require additional stuff. now whether it costs $100 or $10, it will still cost.

also finding syntax errors are similiar whether you are using a markup, script or a compiler.


Most computers also have some sort of assemblers and shell scripting facilities which will serve you well for free, and the last tome I checked, gcc, Python, PHP, Perl, and any one of about 40 other languages were all free. HTML itself isn't programming, but if you use it for any length of time, you will soon find the need for a programming language to extend it.

JavaScript is programming, however . . . it is a complete language just like many others, although people usually don;t use it as such.

As for the difference between scripting and programming, I don't make much of a distinction there. If you compile a progam, it is a "program", if you interpret it, it is a "scipt".
Logged

Nothing says "I Love You" like Corrugated Aluminum.
onoski
Determined IT Hussler
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 775

2


View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2004, 01:36:54 PM »

It is quite a shame to see how some of your feedbacks are negative. If programming in C or Java are so complex how come it is taught in universities? Nothing is easy is life as long as you are willing to sacrifice and work hard with time and keen interest any programming language can be learnt. Just my honest opinion, no one is saying anyone should reinvent the wheel? Or correct me if I'd got your pointers wrong smart dudes.
Logged

Are you still wondering if heaven or hell is real? Well it is and to avoid that Jesus christ is the way, please make the right choice and stop playing games with the devil. The world is messed up, just look around you.
seannmc
Junior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 21

0


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: August 09, 2004, 07:18:58 PM »

Quote
before Tim Berners-Lee and Mike Sendall dreamed up the Web concept. [/b]


What? You mean Al Gore didn't invent it when he invented the internet?   Cheesy
« Last Edit: August 09, 2004, 07:26:09 PM by seannmc » Logged
DaPunisher
Pasta Guru
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 937

2


View Profile WWW
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2004, 03:25:04 PM »

I enjoy working with HTML because its easy.  I took a VB class and my head started spinning :confused: But, then again, it was more interesting to listen to corn grow than the VB instructor.Shocked

I like php. IT kinda remids me of how VB flows.  (Have you guessed i'm not a programming guru?)Cheesy
Logged

BestTests.com- New and improved forums!  Practice exams for A+, Network+ MCDST, MCSE, CCNA and more!

_______________________
me? I dunno...
Senior Member
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1505

0


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: September 17, 2004, 11:25:08 PM »

Hey George, how's it going?

I have decided to have a kick at c++.

its not so bad, got a c++ for dummies book, so far so good.

pointers was a slight hurdle, but google yields tons of c++ info and it seems easy to find relative to particular topic.

http://richardbowles.tripod.com/cpp/cpp18.htm

rock on...Wink
Logged

RJ

The secret to a successful life is learning what to least expect the most...

http://www.cbc.ca/
http://www.vancouver.cbc.ca/
http://english.aljazeera.net/HomePage/
http://www.cnn.com/
sandy7000
Senior Member
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 638

0


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2004, 07:13:12 AM »

If you want a "quick" way (in a VERY relative sense) to start programming, WinBatch is a good option.  It's a hybrid between C++ (in my opinion), DOS, and Windows.  Parts of it have been pre-created so you don't have to worry about coding pop up windows, etc.  

I've taken C++.  If you can fight through it, it's a great base for other languages.
Logged
mikeghet1
Junior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9

0


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: November 12, 2004, 04:01:43 AM »

"As for the difference between scripting and programming, I don't make much of a distinction there. If you compile a progam, it is a "program", if you interpret it, it is a "scipt"."

not to play with words, but java is interpeted(JRE) and compiled(byte code) ;-)

Really there is no right or wrong response, as it depends on the individual.  I think HTML is a good place to start, too.  It gets you used to using syntax, which is a start.  Typically a  computer science major will start with c++ or java.  So why can't you?  I think if you start with java you would be alright, so long as you are really wanting to learn.

If you are really serious, then I recommend taking a digital logic class, then assembly(motorla processor or intel), then C, then C++, or java.  Of course you wouldn't be concerned with these if you were writing scripts for a Unix box or windows box.
Logged
Gomar
Junior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2

0


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: January 05, 2005, 08:55:22 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by curiousgeorge
I am a network admin. I haven't done any programming since my college days 15 years ago. And I forgot everything that I learned.

Where should I begin (which languages and in what order)?

Thanks to all that reply.


And why do you want to learn programming?
to accomplish what?
make 8-bit or flash games which remind you
of Atari2600 or Coleco?
[btw, %80-90 of flash work is programming]

forget about java, c++, .net; too many advanced people know them and they cant get jobs.
Logged
ChrisDfer
Certified Jackass
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1430

2


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: January 07, 2005, 02:14:51 AM »

Knowing a programming language doesn't make you a programmer... programming *to me* has more to do with effectively using the language and using/designing effective algorithms to accomplish the tasks at hand.

A monkey could learn C,C++, or Java but only an Indian can learn to program.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!