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crazy4mcse
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« on: December 21, 2003, 02:32:46 AM »

Hello everyone


I am a newbie to this forum. Planning to enroll in MCSE certification program in January to get all geared up for the actual exams. I tried out CCNA program but didnt go through with it. Just wasn't sure which certification to pursue. Anyhow, i'd appreciate all the tips and advice ya'll can give me. To all the women with their MCSE and other certs., how did you know which certification was right for you?


~ the new girl in town~
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Kasor
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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2003, 10:57:59 PM »

It not what right for you. It is what is your goal and what you want to do at the IT area.

There are many jobs and position in this IT field. You have know what is good for you, you can follow the trend, but will be competitive.

You need to specific a skill that can show your value in this area to get a job. You cannot know everything. Check out your local area what is HOT, and what they need. Then set a path to achieve that goals.

The certification path can be difficult and time consuming..
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plantwiz
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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2003, 12:47:45 AM »

Welcome.

Kasor is correct.

If you are planning on just 'getting certified', that is probably the wrong idea.  There are too many people with real experience without certifications both working and looking for work.  (Probably more people sitting on certs without real experience to back it up).

It would be best to find a path that meets both your interests and goals.

My opinion of 'classes' is that they are a BIG waste of money.  UNLESS, you have experience in the field and need/want to brush up on technique OR you are enrolled in a c0llege program.

I am all for education!  However, I am guessing from your comment that it sounds like you have found a bootcamp-type program.  Hopefully, I am wrong.

Are you currently working in IT in some way?  What are your goals?  Does your current employer reimburse for education/certification?  Is there room in your company to move up? Or will you need to seek other employement?
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Burrows
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2004, 06:54:54 PM »

Hey!

Defo agree with the other guys... you need to have an idea of which area of IT you wanna go in.  However, it's easy to say that not quite knowing much about what you're doing now and what your experience is.

I'm a Tech Support Manager now (managing 2nd / 3rd line... 200 servers, 2000 desktops, 500 laptops...) and I started out in Support... and did my MCSE in NT4.0, ... and you kind of just move in IT where you feel you want to go.  I didn't know I'd stay in support all that time, but if you like the Technical side of things, and hands on nitty gritty of servers / infrastructure, then MCSE is good... (it gets me all excited, but then I could be just a sad techy!) ... but if you're more into the network infrastructure side of things, networking security, firewalls, and all that... MCSE won't be much use to you... having said that, it's always good to have an overall understanding of IT, not just servers... it helps... but something you gain through time and experience more than exams I'd say.

Anyway - after all that waffle, whatever you decide let us know and good luck!
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smrkdown
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2004, 10:58:22 PM »

As far as bootcamps and training centers go, I think it depends on your learning style. If you're an auditory learner and don't mind the great expense then they might be for you. For me, a few good books and a little hands on experience works. It is the cheapest way and most effective for me. I've also talked to a woman who went through an A+ course at one of the leading IT training centers that guaranteed a pass and she failed...
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student615
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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2004, 01:55:15 PM »

You can fail no matter what if you are not ready.
The "no fail" guarantees from such places do not mean you will never fail they mean that eventually you will pass. It can be after first attempt or it can be after X attempt.
Very often these places provide free training after first failure.
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smrkdown
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« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2004, 02:35:46 PM »

You could "eventually" pass by merely guessing. I'd expect some sort of monetary compensation if I paid 1500 dollars for a training camp that didn't prepare me properly.
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student615
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« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2004, 08:19:50 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by smrkdown
You could "eventually" pass by merely guessing. I'd expect some sort of monetary compensation if I paid 1500 dollars for a training camp that didn't prepare me properly.


"PROPERLY"

It is very subjective article - you cannot expect magic and without any sweat (i.e. work) after merely attending a seminar be ready and pass one of the exams - this is from the fairy tale when you sleep and you friens read a text book to you and then in the morning you are ready to pass the exam.

on the serious side:
There are quite a few places that offer money back, pass guarantee etc.
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smrkdown
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2004, 08:41:46 PM »

Anyway, yes I agree that it takes work and I don't believe it should be as easy as going to a bootcamp and being able to pass. I'm just saying that they seem, in my opinion, to be a rip-off. I'm glad I've never attended one. A few good books and some hands-on experience works great for me.
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Mystique
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« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2004, 12:27:19 AM »

HI
you really should decide where you want to go in it, before you try for any certfication. i made the mistake of signing up for this Management of Information Systems degree program right after i finished high school, and it's only after i realised that i was more into the physical side, and then i did A+, and am now trying for net+, because i am realised i had an interest in networking.
some people need tuition, some don't. i think it all depends on how much experience yo have and how much you can actually do.
if you are starting from scratch, and you have no real experience, tuition is recommended, because while the books will tell you how to, say for eexample install windows 2000, and troubleshoot, you don't really understand until you can actually see it done in front of you.. and then try to do it yourself.
IT's a pretty hands on career, so u need to figure out what you feel condfident about, what you can do, and what you want to learn to do. if you choose an area in which you are not interested, certification is going to be tough, and you will never attain the self confidence u need, to have a successfull carrer in IT
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sparkst2
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« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2004, 11:37:43 AM »

Thanks for the info!

Currently completed my A.A.S in Network Administration.  A lot of my classmates want to start working on their mcse.  Talk about time consuming?  I used to set up all the Compaq Computers at Retail accounts, the kinda thing that gets one started in the IT field.  Telecommuted from my home.  This was in 1995.  I was bitten by the bug!  But, if their is one thing I realized it is to find a job and then find your direction with certifications to accommodate your needs.
Well, this was my strategy and from what I read, this is a good strategy.  Thanks Guys!!!!
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