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| | | |-+  Time to stir things up in here
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em_ar_ducks
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« on: September 30, 2003, 11:46:26 PM »

Noticed that there isn't much activity in this forum.

I'm getting ready to take the 219 exam, it should be my last test.

So far I have taken 210,215,218,217,216, and 224, in that order. Passed every one on the first try. 219 seems to be easy from a concept point of view. My only concern is that as I review material and case studies it seems just a bit more difficult to pick the key phrases out that lead in to the questions.

Am I worrying too much? Is it that difficult during the exam compared to the practice tests? Planning to use transcender in a few days after I finish my  reading.
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curiousgeorge
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« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2003, 06:13:43 AM »

For design exams, I would use a different source for practice exams.

I don't believe in "design" exams because if you don't design the network the same way as the M$ test preparer did, you get it wrong.

In the real world, 6 engineers would have 6 different designs for a company's network.

Transcender will not provide you with exam questions close enough to the actual exam. And their product is HIGHLY overpriced.

My source gives you the quotes from the case study with the answers. So not only do you know the answer is right, you know what to look for in the case study.
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jeff_j_black
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« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2003, 11:24:21 AM »

First, read Chapters 9 and 10 from the Deployment Planning Guide on the Microsoft site.

Second, the cases will be obvious enough, if you read the above along with your background (the exams you have already passed), that you won't need to resort to dumps.

Third, if price is a concern, I passed 216,217,219,220,221 using questions I gathered from the "Cheapskates Guide to Guilt Free Practice Exams" at Certcities.c o m. (Of course the questions were only used to supplement good books and lab work.) All  the stuff is free and more than adequate prep for many Microsoft exams, and you won't see the word 'dumps' anywhere near any of the links you go to on the Certcities. c o m site.

I'll let you on on another thing, Certcities is so clean, I can't even post links to it on here, Examnotes wipes it out, but lets people post links to many other braindumps such as testking etc. Try it out for yourself and see. I merely typed braindumps and testking and they are automatically linked. Here is the result of posting a certcities link:

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Maybe someone can explain to me who is on the up and up, but I think I already know.

Anyway, best of luck. You will find 219 to be relatively easy and fun.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2003, 11:29:51 AM by jeff_j_black » Logged
em_ar_ducks
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« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2003, 09:37:45 PM »

I am in a bit of a different situation from some in these forums, I work with a large team of application, hardware, and system engineers to build custom communications systems. Those systems have increasingly been based on Microsoft Operating Systems and contain lots of standard network components.

I spent the last 10 months in formal training, about 400 classroom hours to learn the additional skills necessary to not only pass the exams, but to really learn the Microsoft way of doing things. (the transcender practice tests came with the course, I used them for every test I have taken and compared them to a few others, so far they have been an effective tool for self study, but 219 is a bit different).

My company recognized that although my specific engineering role is not part of the IT staff, that having an engineering resource with IT skills plus my normal duties was beneficial. So the company agreed to reimburse my formal training expenses on the condition that I go to school on my own time, and that I achieve the MCSE.

I supplemented that training with a lot of home study using other reference material at my expense.

I also have spent the last 2+ years at work in a lab putting a system together that uses many of microsoft and cisco's products in a non-typical IT configuration. For example, we originally had a peer to peer network of 7 non-windows workstations, now we have a lopsided system of 200 WIN 2k servers, with less than 30 WIN 2K clients running a custom application.

So I definitely agree regarding the "subjective" nature of "design" exams. Nothing proves your ability more than putting a design together several times and watching it fail before putting it into production and watching it fail again.

Personally, the MCSE is like any other set of letters, it demonstrates a basic skill set in a specifice area of study, but without significant experience both success and failure, it only serves as a foundation.

I designed or helped design and test several communication systems for the past 20 years, and no two engineers do anything the same from the same set of requirements.

That doesn't change the fact that to obtain the certification, we have to take a design exam.
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Paisleyskye
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« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2003, 09:59:25 PM »

As for the braindump links - I dont' know anything really about that.  I thought it led to a glossary until a little while ago.

However, I do remember why certc is blocked out.  It seems to me that I remember a couple of years ago, they did something....I don't remember exactly what it was, but I think they were spamming the forums or trying to get free advertising or something - so they were blocked out.  But again - that's just what I seem to recall.  I do remember that something happened and they did something.
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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2003, 11:33:41 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by curiousgeorge
For design exams, I would use a different source for practice exams.

I don't believe in "design" exams because if you don't design the network the same way as the M$ test preparer did, you get it wrong.

In the real world, 6 engineers would have 6 different designs for a company's network.

Transcender will not provide you with exam questions close enough to the actual exam. And their product is HIGHLY overpriced.

My source gives you the quotes from the case study with the answers. So not only do you know the answer is right, you know what to look for in the case study.

My apologies!  I actually thought you were an IT professional.
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« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2003, 12:01:57 AM »

em_ar_ducks...

You are doing a great job! Always good to have expertise coming from the 'Heads' side of the coin, looking under the hood and seeing what the engine, tranny and suspension of the vehicle you are driving!

I realy want to come in from the other direction and get back into coding. I am trying to do a lot of batching and vbs scripting right now and I would like to do more. What do you think?
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em_ar_ducks
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« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2003, 12:41:09 AM »

Jeff,

Yea, I'm looking into that next as well. For security purposes we have to disable most of the support for scripting, so I am constantly in a mode of weighing "utility" vs. network vulnerability.

Most of the jobs right now seem to ask for AD scripting as well as other stuff, it seems to be a pretty powerful skill to acquire.

I read "Windows & .NET" magazine and the articles from the pros that write scripts just amaze me. I'm really a hardware guy at heart and the coding stuff has always baffled me. My job is usually to define what I want to happen to the people who write the code and then to test the results.

Due to the nature of the system, I have also been looking into automatic installation scripting, etc. Anything to make the deployment of our systems "bullet-proof". The nature of the application demands that the servers need to be replaceable and back up and running within 30 minutes of a failure. So I have to "pre-deploy" replacement hardware with generic software loads, then "update" them post install with any more recent data or apps to get the network fully functional again.

We have a lot of redundancy to minimize downtime, but we still have to avoid the potential of concurrent failures within a site, so even though the system is fault-tolerant I have to get the broke stuff fixed fast.

Right now we are using a combination of hardware/software redundancy, imaging, and SMS to ensure that we can work through a failure, recover the hardware, restore applications, service packs, hotfixes, etc. to the most current configuration as rapidly as possible.

I get to play with some pretty expensive stuff, but it also means that the customers expect it to be near perfect and don't listen to excuses very well.
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jeff_j_black
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« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2003, 01:15:43 AM »

What I see in the short term for the most part in coding is interfacing the various Identity Management functions to bring dislike environments together. What do you think?
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em_ar_ducks
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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2003, 06:50:45 PM »

There probably is some utility in doing that on small scale jobs.

The large scale stuff is pretty well handled by people like IBM (Tivoli) and other enterprise management systems. Tivoli has some stuff to integrate account information between platforms and applications that looks pretty good on the surface. I just feel that only the larger organizations will be able to afford it.
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