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Author Topic: IT Career Women  (Read 11139 times)
Papiya
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« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2003, 04:47:41 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by TJLeeland
Boy, I hate to be saying this, but I really think I've run into more clueless women in IT than men. As a percentage it's much higher since there are so few women in IT as it is.


You need to get out more. I just came back from putting a shortcut on a male collegaue's desk because he couldn't figure out how to do it. (To be fair he is mainframe-skilled and PC-illiterate).
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TJLeeland
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« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2003, 06:14:54 PM »

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Originally posted by Papiya
(To be fair he is mainframe-skilled and PC-illiterate).


Well then, that's not fair!:)
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Don't be afraid of paper certs. Sure, they may get an interview - but if you can't prove to an employer that you know more than some pretender you have a lot more than paper certs to worry about!
racerdeb
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« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2003, 10:57:54 PM »

I don't think NT is the measurement of cluelessness.  NT goes away Jan. 2004.  It's everything after that including 2005 that will be the true measure of a qualified IT professional.
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TJLeeland
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« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2003, 04:55:51 AM »

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Originally posted by racerdeb
I don't think NT is the measurement of cluelessness.  NT goes away Jan. 2004.  It's everything after that including 2005 that will be the true measure of a qualified IT professional.
:confused:

Yeah, um...I suspect you didn't read the post four above your own. I think most people would agree that it certainly was a good indicator in 1998. No?
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Don't be afraid of paper certs. Sure, they may get an interview - but if you can't prove to an employer that you know more than some pretender you have a lot more than paper certs to worry about!
em_ar_ducks
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« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2003, 08:43:44 AM »

It's not a male/female thing.

I once worked with a progammer/developer who had a BSEE, Masters in Math, and  PHD in Computer Science. Had worked in industry for over 20 years, and still had to be lead by much more junior engineers when the time came to actually do something. By the way this person actually taught at a community college part time.

There used to be a formula we used to evaluate any group of working people:

80% of the real work is typically done by less than 20% of the available workers.

Also remember, most people who really enjoy and know the job seldom find their way into management where they can/could make a difference. Basically because no one likes the burden of management.

My guess (from personal exp.) is that in every case where there is some dead weight, there is a management organization that has issues as well. Or maybe by looking a bit deeper the clueless person has some hidden value that we are overlooking from our own cluelessness.
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jessibell
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« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2003, 10:39:17 AM »

I got to say that as a woman I have met equally incappable men and women in the IT industry. I came into IT as a project manager (which I hated) at which time I barely knew one end of a PC from the other.

The more I learnt the more I wanted to learn. I stepped down to be an administrator, and from that experience have become a systems support technician in a medium sized business supporting everything OS based, various apps, and 1st lining hardware and programmer type calls.

I am well on my way to achieving an MCSE:Security and have never installed a server in my life. I have done PCs though. This means that I know what windows is capable of doing, and know the theory of doing it, just don't always know what buttons to press to achieve it!

There is tonnes I don't know, and will never know, but I learn more every day and know that I will never stop. I dare sometimes I look a bit dim, but not for long cause I don't need telling twice Smiley
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student615
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« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2003, 07:47:33 PM »

There is always something to learn even when you think you are done.
About 8 years ago I have moved from Europe to the states, by that time I have been working with Oracle for a few years. At that time I have been told by quite a few gentlemen that Oracle is nothing in this country and if I want to succeed I better learn something else. Few years later they had to learn Oracle.

I agree it is not a male/female thing.
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AMDWiZARD
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« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2003, 08:19:00 AM »

I've never met a woman in IT who knew what she was talking about. If she did, I would be overly impressed. Im not talking about Hard drives and RAM, the simple concepts...
I'm talking about Forest trusts, Active Directory migrations, Exchange Servers, and Network design, oh and especially DNS and a knowledge of how it all works together.
 
Start talking about VPN's, security, and subnets and they'll look at you cross-eyed.
There are men in IT that are clueless, just not as much as women.


AMDWiZARD
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Knowledge IS POWER!

Greatness REQUIRES Sacrifice!
nethead
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« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2003, 08:53:50 AM »

It all depends what areas you work in. I'll freely admit I don't know anything about Forest trusts, Active Directory migrations, and Exchange Servers - but this is because it is not my area. Whereas I do know about Network design, DNS, subnets, security etc because personally I work in Networks. I'm sure its equally the same for everyone - but some people are better at blagging than others Smiley

Don't write us all off - there are some very knowledgeable women in IT, but I assume none of us have met you yet.
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dianeteg
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« Reply #24 on: December 22, 2003, 01:18:06 PM »

AMDWizard says he's "never met a woman in IT who knew what she was talking about."  Wow!  In today's day and age, I had no idea that men still held such misogynistic attitudes about women, especially those that they work with.  Not only does he admit to holding the stereotype, he proudly proclaims it in a discussion under "IT Career Women."
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fpbaker
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« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2003, 04:24:21 PM »

Unless there is a study where such variables as time in the job, education before the job, age, martial/child status, etc can be held constant there is no factual basis for any opinion.

Personally I am much more concerned about people who dont know things tring to bluff their way through it, a behavior I have observed in men (what makes anyone think we ask directions inside our office if we dont outide it), than women. People who ask are less likely to break.

I am not reading in a lot of places that the future holds greater emphasis on hard skills vs soft ones. So EVEN IF you have X more facts in your head than a member of the 51% club, that may not be as important as you would like it to be. My personal experence is that I get mentoring as well as give it.
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georgettey
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« Reply #26 on: February 13, 2004, 06:47:21 PM »

I'm preparing for the 70-210 exam, but I don't know which books to use. I've heard mixed views about Transcenders and Cramsession. Does anyone have any suggestions on books or websites? Thanks
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yanqui
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« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2004, 07:32:00 PM »

I think IT is a much leveler playing field than just about any other, because of the very diverse strengths and talents it takes to do the many different types of IT work there are. Some people are better problem solvers at a hands-on level, some are more analytical, some are able to explain what just happened (and some are absolutely NOT!), some can install (but not troubleshoot and repair), and when you bring in all the hardware, software, networking, web apps, security, server stuff, there's such a vast selection of jobs within the umbrella of "Information Technology."  And it's probably why there are so many idiots trying to get into it when they ought to be flipping burgers.  Our company has some talented and dedicated IT people.  Unfortunately I think the IT director has been bitten by the chauvinist bug, because one female tech had to leave becuase of medical problems, the other one was shuttled into an admin position within that department, and the department's only other female is a project manager.  I've applied, but there is a "hiring freeze" that will probably be lifted when I leave.  I'm a better troubleshooter than at least one of the male techs, and I'm at least as willing to do the grunt work as he is; I did better than he did on the A+ exams, and I'm probably more ready for Net+ than he is.  But I'll have to go somewhere else to use it.
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Papiya
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« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2004, 04:17:32 PM »

Quote
Originally posted by AMDWiZARD
I've never met a woman in IT who knew what she was talking about. If she did, I would be overly impressed. Im not talking about Hard drives and RAM, the simple concepts...
I'm talking about Forest trusts, Active Directory migrations, Exchange Servers, and Network design, oh and especially DNS and a knowledge of how it all works together.
 
Start talking about VPN's, security, and subnets and they'll look at you cross-eyed.
There are men in IT that are clueless, just not as much as women.


AMDWiZARD


Were you born this stupid or did you have to practise?
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hilyf
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« Reply #29 on: April 02, 2004, 05:07:33 AM »

Hi guys,
is there a female on this forum who is persuing the career in IT while also having a family of her own to look after? If so can you tell me how you manage your time? Anyone else who doesnt fall in this catolgory but can suggest some advice please feel free to share your input .

thanks-a-mil
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