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Tech Ranger
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« on: June 17, 2003, 11:11:34 PM »

On page 137 of the MS Press book, there is a discussion of defining a Forest Root Domain.  The options offered are "Designating an existing domain" or "Designating a dedicated domain".  I am very confused.  I thought that the Forest root domain is ALWAYS the first domain created when you start this whole thing.  Can anybody explain.  By anybody, I guess I mean Jeff.
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2003, 03:36:42 PM »

The logical basis of AD is DNS. If existing DNS supports SRV records then you could install AD root there. You could also make a sub domain to the existing zone as the AD root.

An empty root domain is cool to isolate enterprise admin accounts and provide flexibily for adding and removing domains without effecting forest root.
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2003, 09:39:05 PM »

What does MS mean by designating an existing domain?  Doesn't the decision of the Root have to be done at the beginning, when you install AD?
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2003, 11:11:16 PM »

You could upgrade the existing NT 4.0 domain for example. Again think in terms of a domain being a DNS domain name. You could be running UNIX and use the existing domain. Your UNIX domain: UNIX.com has DNS zones that support SRV records and Dynamic Update. Your first Windows 2000 Server promoted to domain controller in UNIX.com would still be the root AD domain, even though you have UNIX running the DNS.
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