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1  Microsoft (MCSE, MCSD, MOUS, MCAD) / Server 2003 / Please Help on: April 05, 2005, 04:38:01 PM
This might not be what you're looking for but...
http://www.petri.co.il/administer_exchange_2003_from_windows_xp_2000_2003.htm

Cheers,
TB
2  CompTIA / Security+ / Home stretch on: March 28, 2005, 04:40:22 PM
Microsoft tests are a bit more challenging and require a good bit of reading and a good amount of practice in a lab (I'd recommend a mimumum of 3 systems or 3 virtual PC sessions, 2 servers and 1 client). Be sure to read the exam objectives and read up on the subjects that it covers. Unlike CompTIA tests, Microsoft will at times go into depth.

Exams are varying length as far as the number of questions and amount of time given (I believe that 290 is 175 minutes and 45 questions), so time management can be critical. As a rule, generally figure a reasonable amount of time that would allow you to complete the questions ie: 2 minutes. and if you don't have an answer that jumps out at you by then, mark it and move on. Like the CompTIA tests, if you aren't sure about a question, mark the question and come back to it.

Know your stuff, practice it and as always go into the exam rested and relaxed and you should be okay.

Cheers,
TB
3  CompTIA / Security+ / Help,info,and advice! on: March 28, 2005, 04:25:47 PM
The main thing is that you will need to understand the concepts you are reading about, but don't worry about knowing the in depth details. For example Symmetric encryption requires 1 key to be distributed that can use various algorithms with different key lengths, however you do not need to know how to create the key or how to encrypt or decrypt the message.

Cheers,
TB
4  CompTIA / Security+ / Home stretch on: March 28, 2005, 01:46:32 PM
Congratulations on the pass!

Which exam are you going for next?

Cheers,
TB
5  CompTIA / Security+ / Home stretch on: March 27, 2005, 07:20:40 PM
Take your time through the test, however try not to spend more than 30 seconds on any question on the first time through.
Read the questions carefully.
Mark anything you are unsure of to come back to.
Remember that everything is about generalities, such as: Which is more dangerous: something that can be found on the Internet that anyone could get or something one person might have.

With that said, you should do fine. Go in relaxed rather than tense and if the knowledge is there, which it seems to be, you should be okay.

Cheers,
TB
6  CompTIA / Security+ / Home stretch on: March 26, 2005, 11:16:11 PM
Remember that SMTP is a protocol, which sends a data stream (plain text) using TCP port 25.

S/MIME is primarily designed to provide non-repudiation (digital certificates), authentication (using Asymmetric keys) and confidentiality (using Symmetric keys) to e-mail.

Remember that the sender uses the sender's private key to create a digital signature, the recipient's public key to send the symmetric key and the symmetric key allows the recipient to read the contents of the e-mail.
 
Cheers,
TB
7  CompTIA / Security+ / Home stretch on: March 25, 2005, 03:54:57 PM
Maybe this will help: http://www.imc.org/smime-pgpmime.html

Cheers,
TB
8  CompTIA / Security+ / Home stretch on: March 24, 2005, 08:10:31 PM
I didn't think the detail level was really that bad. Actually I felt that this exam was like a stream 20 feet wide and 1 inch deep; a lot of generalities and opinion questions based on policy and proceedure. Also, remember to reason the questions out not so much in an IT professional way, but rather from say a non-computer oriented POV.

Best of luck.

Cheers,
TB
9  CompTIA / Network+ / passed!! on: March 21, 2005, 12:59:14 AM
Congratulations on the pass.

The majority of Microsoft exams are best learned with a lot of reading and through practice and implementation in a lab environment. Review the exam objectives, research the topics covered by those objectives and don't be afraid of delving a little deeper than the study guide level.

Cheers,
TB
10  CompTIA / Network+ / should I set up a lab? on: March 20, 2005, 10:22:12 PM
The Network+ seems to test more on memory and concepts than it does on items that you would use through a lab. Setting up a lab is nice and might help visualize some of the concepts, however it won't necessarily help with items such as the OSI model or what is the max attenuation length of 10B5 is.

Cheers,
TB
11  Microsoft (MCSE, MCSD, MOUS, MCAD) / Server 2003 / 70-290 on: March 20, 2005, 10:06:56 PM
You could go the cheap, but still effective way, which would be to look at the exam objectives and compare them against White Papers and items in the Res Kit on the Microsoft site.

Cheers,
TB
12  CompTIA / Security+ / Home stretch on: March 19, 2005, 11:33:39 PM
Perhaps this might help a little. I apologize for any rehash of data.

Hash
- AKA Message Digest
- One way conversion of text to digest
- Mainly used for file integrity checking
- digest, if used for passwords, is vulnerable to dictionary attacks
- MD5 is also vulnerable due to Birthday attacks
- SHA-1 (160 bit), MD-5 (128 bit)

Symmetric
- AKA Shared key
- faster than Asymmetric
- Provides confidentiality
- 1 key to encrypt and decrypt
- key management is extremely important
- if key is comprimised or disclosed, a new key must be generated and securely distributed
- AES (Rijandael), DES, 3DES, CAST-128, Blowfish, IDEA, RC-4

Asymmetric
- Public key encryption, uses 2 keys, public and private
- Can provide authentication, confidentiality, integrity and non-repudiation
- Registration of keys requires the submission of a public key
- If private key is ever disclosed, certificate must be revoked using CRL and a new key pair generated
- If user1 sends confidential data to user2, user1 encrypts the data with user2's public key, user2 decrypts it with user2's private key.
- If user1 is concerned with integrity and not confidentiality, user1 encrypts the data with user1's private key and should user2 access it, he would use user1's public key to decrypt it.
- Diffie-Hellman, RSA, DSA, El Gamel

Cheers,
TB
13  Other IT certifications / Linux/Unix / FreeBSD on: May 03, 2004, 10:30:40 PM
The easiest way would be CVSup.

FreeBSD Documentation.

Cheers,
TB
14  Other IT certifications / Linux/Unix / linux on: April 18, 2004, 08:36:53 PM
CompTIA Linux+

Cheers,
TB
15  CompTIA / Security+ / Failed but with Questions on: April 12, 2004, 06:44:36 PM
Some stuff on Access Controls

Info on PPTP

Cheers,
TB
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